Writing for Children's Magazines
An Ezine
 

 

  Celebrate Your Stories  

  By Marilyn Kratz  

 

 

 

We all write with the hope that something we’ve written will touch others in a special way. Maybe a child will take courage by reading about how another child faced a similar problem to one they’re facing. Maybe something you’ve written brings back happy memories to a reader.

When I saw my friend Virginia one day years ago, I couldn’t resist telling her I’d used a modified version of an incident involving her in a fictional children’s story I had just written.

The incident had happened when Virginia lived across the street from me. She knew my young daughter Lisa was afraid of her little dachshund dog named Schnapps. So, when the children on the street were out delivering May baskets, Virginia came over carrying Schnapps and a candy bar. She told Lisa the candy bar was a May basket from Schnapps. That helped Lisa relax around the little dog, and she actually petted him. Virginia had almost forgotten that incident. I could tell she enjoyed being reminded of it.

As the day went on, I forgot about my conversation with Virginia. Then that evening, I got a phone call from her.

“I just had to call and tell you I’ve had a smile on my face all day since you reminded me of that incident,” she said. “Thank you for giving me a happy day.”

That felt good. And it made me think back to some other times when I know my writing has touched my readers. It seems to be more common when I’ve written nonfiction about people, places, or events, as I now do in the nostalgia columns I write for a local weekly newspaper. I remember a young cousin thanking me for writing an article about our grandmother that was published in an “Ideals” magazine. He was so young when she died that he couldn’t remember her clearly. My article gave him a mental picture to turn to and enjoy.

I suspect most of us don’t talk about our writing very often in our conversations. But it’s all right to share experiences that might touch the hearts of others. It’s a good reason to celebrate the fact that you are a writer, and your work is important in many ways.



Writing for Children's Magazines, February 2017           Copyright Marilyn Kratz
 

 

 

   
Marilyn Kratz has been a free lance writer for 45 years. In that time she has had 5 books and over 650 magazine stories, articles, and poems published, mostly in children's magazines such as Highlights for Children, High Five, Hello, Cricket group magazines and church school publications. Her newest book is Quilts and Country Gardens - Remembering a Simpler Time, which is available on Amazon.com. She is a retired elementary teacher and a member of SCBWI.

 

 


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